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Phd thesis on human resources management

Difficulties in inducting new hires into organisational culture: An overview of workforce induction in Zara. The possibility of HR leading organisational strategy: Trends from new tech companies. The problem of employee motivation in a social life driven by high peer-pressure.

23 PhD Dissertation Topics In Human Resource Management

Relating motivation with performance: A literature review between and Effect of subordinate and peer performance reviews on performance standards: A study of NHS. Does training affect growth during recessions? An analysis of British banks in the recent recession. HRM versus unions: Effects in the British automobile sector.

Theses and Dissertations (Human Resource Management)

You may change the organisations in the title you pick. If you want, you can take our help in doing it, that too, free. Fill in the form and let us send you the topics as per your submitted requirements. After you approve a topic, you will get topic brief of at least word which includes;. Tell us in the comments section below how you liked this HR research topics list. If you have any questions, feel free to ask our online chat assistants. Your email address will not be published. Does this title raise a research problem I could write a whole dissertation on? Is it broad and deep enough for me to write an extended report?

Does it represent a set of objectives that are practical and measurable?

Will it be a wild goose chase if I go after this topic? And a couple others such. List of Recent Dissertation Topics in human resource Management Remember to customise any topic you pick from this blog or anywhere on the Internet so it becomes your own. Significance of training in a culturally diverse organisation: The case of HSBC UK Difficulties in inducting new hires into organisational culture: An overview of workforce induction in Zara The possibility of HR leading organisational strategy: Trends from new tech companies The problem of employee motivation in a social life driven by high peer-pressure Relating motivation with performance: A literature review between and Effect of subordinate and peer performance reviews on performance standards: A study of NHS Implementing HR best practices in global firms: Comparing Rolls Royce and Tesco Does training affect growth during recessions?

Students will explore several metaphors of organizations from mechanistic to organic to network, among others. The students will look at organizations through several all-encompassing frames to understand how a leader can leverage these new perspectives to better manage processes, the implications of social change, and innovative strategies.


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Students will also continue building the skills required to succeed in the program and leverage those skills as they begin working on their dissertation topics. Students are asked to reflect each week on their learnings and how those learnings are shaping their specialization perspective. Students will deepen their understanding of APA, scholarly writing, and the importance of integrity in writing; they will also hone their analysis and evaluation skills.

Organizations are increasingly a reflection of the confluence of dynamic influences and pressures to compete in an uncertain environment. Leaders need to stimulate creative and innovative approaches to products, services, and operations. Yet, organizations also need to have predictable control systems to enable the efficient utilization of resources. Students in this course cover some basic to intermediate concepts, models, and theories from general systems theory, systems thinking, network theory, complex adaptive systems theory, complexity leadership theory, and evolutionary systems theory with applications to social organizations.

Students use a provided template to model, describe, and apply these concepts to an organization of their choice such as society-at-large or a subset of society; a community, city, county, state, or country; or a corporation, a nonprofit, government agency, an educational institution, or a military organization as this course starts from abstract systems and moves to concrete instances. Throughout this course, students will improve their understanding of systems, organizations, and leadership or management decision-making capabilities.

In today's highly complex organizations, rational and behavioral decision-making processes and models impact leadership, ethics, group dynamics, and risk assessment. Students will examine the ethical implications of organizational decisions based on the literature. Students will also explore, evaluate, and debate how judgments and decisions influence team dynamics and an organization's social responsibility decisions.

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Students will also develop a deeper appreciation for predictive and adaptive decision systems and the impact of artificial intelligence and autonomous systems on an organization's decision processes. Students will continue to develop their skills assessment plan and tie what they learn to their specialization and, ultimately, the dissertation process.

Students will focus on developing their analysis capabilities of peer-reviewed literature related to their specialization, and decision making and judgment. The focus of this organizational behavior and human capital development course is on organizational behavior, motivation, collaboration, and performance and evaluation of individuals and teams. Some of the questions that may be explored relate to how human resource managers motivate and build resiliency in their organizational culture.

Students will also consider the influence of organizational structure behavior of individuals and teams, how behavior and motivation are impacted in a global virtual environment, and the impact of expert systems and artificial intelligence on the behavior of employees.

Strategic Management Ideas

The focus of this course is on strategic planning that supports labor relations, succession planning, retention of both tacit and explicit knowledge, as well as the strategic role of information technology in human resources management. Students will also consider the regulatory requirements for global organizations as well as establishment of a positive social and ethical environment.

Managing organizational talent in the 21st century requires organizations to fully engage their workforce to optimize their motivation, commitment, and productivity. Leadership and management of the organizational talent strategy to optimize the global talent is a current organizational necessity, which requires talent management leaders to consider new workforce strategies for selection, recruitment, and retention of the workforce. Topics to be considered include information technology impact on talent management, recognition and reward systems, compensation and benefits, as well as the need to engage an agile workforce.

In this research course, students are provided with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the graduate level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the role of theory, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research designs and data collection methods are introduced.

The alignment of research components is emphasized. Students also explore ethical and social change implications of designing and conducting research. Students demonstrate their knowledge and skills by developing an annotated bibliography. In this research course, students are provided with the opportunity to develop core knowledge and skills for designing and carrying out quantitative research at the doctoral level, including the application of statistical concepts and techniques.

Students explore classical common statistical tests, the importance of the logic of inference, and social change implications of conducting quantitative research and producing knowledge. Students approach statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting appropriate statistical tests for a research design.

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Students use statistical software to derive statistics from quantitative data and interpret and present results. Students in this research course are provided with the opportunity to develop basic knowledge and skills for conducting qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students practice collecting, organizing, analyzing, and presenting data, and they develop a detailed research topic for conducting a qualitative study.

Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in the prerequisite quantitative reasoning course and are presented with opportunities to apply them. They are provided with more specialized knowledge and skills for conducting quantitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding multivariate data analysis and applying more advanced statistical concepts, such as factorial ANOVA, mediation, moderation, logistic regression, ANCOVA, and MANOVA.

Students explore existing datasets and apply suitable statistical tests to answer research questions with social change implications. In this course, they approach statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting the appropriate statistical tests for more complex research questions and social problems. Students use statistical software to perform analyses and interpret and present results. They will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by carrying out a quantitative research project.

RSCH Students develop a more sophisticated understanding of the theoretical antecedents and practical applications of eight contemporary qualitative approaches. Students gain experience developing qualitative interview guides, collecting data, and managing the process from transcription through analysis.

The unique challenges of confidentiality and ethical issues are explored as well as implications for social change. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan using a topic relevant to their capstone.

Students are provided with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. They gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question s.

The emphases of this course are on integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practice in data analysis, and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a mixed-methods research plan that incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements appropriately. The prospectus is a brief document that is critical to articulate the general topic under consideration for a dissertation. Students will align, organize, delineate, and make decisions regarding their dissertation and appropriate research methodology.

Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to design the prospectus in collaboration with program colleagues and mentorship from a course instructor. Students learn preferred practices for developing the prospectus and analyze examples of past documents. Students refine their problem and purpose statements along with their research questions. Then they finalize their decisions about the research method and design that may be incorporated into their dissertation. Finally, students engage in the iterative process of writing the prospectus, integrating feedback from peers and the course instructor.

Students will incorporate all the skills learned throughout the program and apply them in the development of their prospectus. There are two major gates in the dissertation process that students must be aware of: the development of the proposal and the research phase. In this course, students are provided with an overview of the dissertation development process. The prospectus is further developed into the proposal and then into the final study. Students will understand the dissertation development process, how to work with feedback, how to manage their dissertation process, and how to collaborate with their committee members.

Students will cover the major dissertation gates they will need to have, including the development of the proposal, the role of the University Research Reviewer URR , preparing for the Institutional Review Board IRB , collecting data, analyzing data, developing results, and articulating findings. They will develop a time management plan to have a realistic understanding of what will be required with respect to their educational, personal, and work commitment balance as they move to their dissertation course. Students will review all the skills developed throughout the program and see how those skills apply to the dissertation development process.

The dissertation has two literature reviews. The first literature review is developed for the content Chapter 2 , and the second literature review is related to the method and design Chapter 3. Students will begin to formalize the development of both components for the proposal. This course is an opportunity for students to focus on the development of their literature review and begin to compose a draft of their Chapter 2 and part of their Chapter 3 for their proposal. Students are encouraged to leverage all the literature they have amassed throughout their program of study and begin to analyze and synthesize the topics that are relevant to the content, method, and design.

The focus of this course will be on advanced-level skills development in analysis, synthesis, and reflection. In the final Dissertation, independent scholars demonstrate their ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience so that new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice, or policy constructs evaluated and advanced.